Injunction

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DEFINITION of 'Injunction'

A court order that prevents somebody from doing something specific. An injunction is used by a court when monetary restitution isn't sufficient to remedy the harm. For example, if someone wrecks your car, it's easy to put a monetary damage amount on that. But if someone is threatening to sell a video of you in a compromising situation, it's more important to stop the video from getting out than to quantify the damages.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Injunction'

Temporary injunctions are commonly used when a legal issue hasn't been decided yet. For example, let's say a married couple owns a baseball team. That couple is going through a divorce and there is a dispute as to who owns and controls the team. If the husband tried to move the team to another city, the wife would be able to get a temporary injunction to prevent the move until the court decided the ownership issue.

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