Inland Bill Of Lading

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DEFINITION of 'Inland Bill Of Lading'

A legal document required for the transportation of materials over land. An inland bill of lading serves as both the carrier's receipt to the shipper and the carriage contract. The document specifies the details of the goods being transported, such as quantity, type and destination.

BREAKING DOWN 'Inland Bill Of Lading'

An inland bill of lading allows the transporter to move goods across domestic land, via rail or truck. If the goods are to be shipped overseas, an addition document known as an "ocean bill of lading" is required. The inland bill only allows the materials to reach the shore, while the ocean bill allows its transport overseas.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Can I use the same bill of lading for all modes of transportation?

    The same bill of lading cannot be used for all modes of transportation. There are several types of bills of lading, including ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. When has the United States run its largest trade deficits?

    In macroeconomics, balance of trade is one of the leading economic metrics that determines the trading relationship of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Which is more important to a nation's economy, the balance of trade or the balance ...

    There is no question the composition of a country's balance of payments is more important than its balance of trade. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between cost and freight (CFR) and cost, insurance and freight ...

    The difference between cost and freight (CFR) and cost, insurance and freight (CIF) is essentially the requirement under ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The difference between cost and freight (CFR) and free on board (FOB) lies in who has responsibility for various shipping ... Read Full Answer >>
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