Inland Bill Of Lading

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DEFINITION of 'Inland Bill Of Lading'

A legal document required for the transportation of materials over land. An inland bill of lading serves as both the carrier's receipt to the shipper and the carriage contract. The document specifies the details of the goods being transported, such as quantity, type and destination.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Inland Bill Of Lading'

An inland bill of lading allows the transporter to move goods across domestic land, via rail or truck. If the goods are to be shipped overseas, an addition document known as an "ocean bill of lading" is required. The inland bill only allows the materials to reach the shore, while the ocean bill allows its transport overseas.

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