Inorganic Growth


DEFINITION of 'Inorganic Growth'

A growth in the operations of a business that arises from mergers or takeovers, rather than an increase in the companies own business activity. Firms that choose to grow inorganically can gain access to new markets and fresh ideas that become available through successful mergers and acquisitions.

BREAKING DOWN 'Inorganic Growth'

Inorganic growth is seen often as a faster way for a company to grow when compared with organic growth. In many industries, such as technology, growth is often accelerated through increased innovation, and one way for firms to compete is to align themselves with those companies that are developing the innovative technology.

  1. Acquisition

    A corporate action in which a company buys most, if not all, ...
  2. Takeover

    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for ...
  3. Organic Growth

    The growth rate that a company can achieve by increasing output ...
  4. Hostile Takeover

    The acquisition of one company (called the target company) by ...
  5. Growth Rates

    The amount of increase that a specific variable has gained within ...
  6. Merger

    The combining of two or more companies, generally by offering ...
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  1. What is the difference between a merger and a takeover?

    In a general sense, mergers and takeovers (or acquisitions) are very similar corporate actions - they combine two previously ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do companies merge with or acquire other companies?

    Some of the reasons for mergers and acquisitions (M&A) include: 1. Synergy: The most used word in M&A is synergy, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How attractive is the food and beverage sector for a growth investor?

    The food and beverage sector is attractive for a growth investor. The sector's high degree of volatility means it tends to ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What happens to the shares of stock purchased in a tender offer?

    The shares of stock purchased in a tender offer become the property of the purchaser. From that point forward, the purchaser, ... Read Full Answer >>

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