Inorganic Growth

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DEFINITION of 'Inorganic Growth'

A growth in the operations of a business that arises from mergers or takeovers, rather than an increase in the companies own business activity. Firms that choose to grow inorganically can gain access to new markets and fresh ideas that become available through successful mergers and acquisitions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Inorganic Growth'

Inorganic growth is seen often as a faster way for a company to grow when compared with organic growth. In many industries, such as technology, growth is often accelerated through increased innovation, and one way for firms to compete is to align themselves with those companies that are developing the innovative technology.

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