Inside Director

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Inside Director'

A board member who is an employee, officer or stakeholder in the company. Inside directors - and outside directors, for that matter - have a fiduciary duty to the company of which board they sit on, and are expected to always act in the best interests of the company. Because of their specialized knowledge about the inner workings of the company, a strong board of inside directors is a key element in its success.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Inside Director'

Inside directors typically include a company's top executives, such as the chief operating officer, the chief financial officer and the chief operating officer, as well as representatives of major shareholders and lenders, and representatives of other stakeholders, such as labor unions.

An institutional investor who is considering making a sizable investment in a company will often insist on appointing one or more of the investor's representatives to the company's board of directors as a condition of such investment.




RELATED TERMS
  1. Non-Executive Director

    A member of a company's board of directors who is not part of ...
  2. Insider Buying

    The purchase of shares of stock in a corporation by someone who ...
  3. Board Of Directors

    An appointed or elected body or committee that has overall responsibility ...
  4. Conflict Of Interest

    A situation where a professional, or a corporation, has a vested ...
  5. Business Judgment Rule

    A regulation that helps to make sure a corporation's board of ...
  6. Outside Director

    Any member of a company's board of directors who is not an employee ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Do ETFs have a board of directors?

    Yes. An exchange-traded fund (ETF) is a type of security that tracks a basket of assets or an index (such as an index fund), ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why should investors research the C-suite executives of a company?

    C-suite executives are essential for creating and enacting overall firm strategy and are therefore an important aspect of ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between a direct and an indirect distribution channel?

    A direct distribution channel is organized and managed by the firm itself. An indirect distribution channel relies on intermediaries ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can an investor determine a company's annual return from looking at its financial ...

    The funds in a share premium account cannot be used for a company's general expenses. These funds are restricted in terms ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the key differences between pro forma statements and GAAP statements?

    The U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) require companies to adhere to uniform reporting standards that ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do companies identify and manage business risk?

    In each stage of the business life cycle, companies face both internal and external risks that can have detrimental effects ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    How To Become A Corporate Board Member

    We look at how corporate boards are constructed, and how investors can get involved.
  2. Insurance

    Evaluating The Board Of Directors

    Corporate structure can tell you a lot about a company's potential. Learn more here.
  3. Investing Basics

    The Basics Of Corporate Structure

    CEOs, CFOs, presidents and vice presidents: learn how to tell the difference.
  4. Investing

    Nasty Shareholder Activist Battles And Why They Happened

    Shareholder activists can have a big impact on a company's operations. These battles turned ugly as management lost control.
  5. Options & Futures

    Can Insiders Help You Make Better Trades?

    Find out why the trading activity of owners and executives can be a valuable trade-confirmation tool.
  6. Economics

    What is a Business Model?

    Business model is the term for a company’s plan as to how it will earn revenue.
  7. Investing Basics

    What is a Minority Interest?

    A minority interest is an ownership or equity interest of less than 50% of an enterprise.
  8. Professionals

    Understanding Operations Management

    Operations management is concerned with converting materials and labor into goods and services as efficiently as possible to maximize profits.
  9. Investing News

    A New Corporate Governance Initiative In Japan

    Expectations are low that Japan can create a corporate governance climate that meets global standards, but a new initiative is aimed at doing just that.
  10. Stock Analysis

    Will American Airlines Fall Back To Earth In 2015?

    The airline industry enjoys blockbuster profits, and American Airlines Group has been a key beneficiary of the favorable trends that have lifted stocks.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  2. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  3. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  4. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  5. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  6. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
Trading Center