Inspectorial Powers

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DEFINITION of 'Inspectorial Powers'

A state administrator's or other regulatory entity's power to initiate investigations to determine whether provisions of the Uniform Securities Act have been violated or are about to be violated.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Inspectorial Powers'

Typical inspectorial powers includes the ability to issue subpoenas, require witnesses to provide materials relevant to the investigation, and to require written statements under oath. Inspectorial powers are necessary for an administrative body to properly monitor market participants' compliance with existing laws and regulations.

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