Installment Receipt

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DEFINITION of 'Installment Receipt'

A debt or equity issuance in which the purchaser does not pay the full value of the issue up front. In the purchase of an installment receipt, an initial payment is made to the issuer at the time the issue closes; the remaining balance must be paid in installments, usually within a two-year period . Although the purchaser has not paid the full value of the issue, he or she is still entitled to full voting rights and dividends.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Installment Receipt'

This type of debt or equity financing is most attractive to issuers that are unable to get an attractive price for more traditional financing techniques, such as a traditional initial public offering (IPO).

Installment receipts often trade on an exchange, in which case, whoever purchases them assumes liability for any installments that may remain. This type of financing is mainly seen in Canada.

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