Institute Of Internal Auditors - IIA

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DEFINITION of 'Institute Of Internal Auditors - IIA'

A leader in certification, education and research for professionals engaged in evaluating an organization's operations and controls. Established in 1941, the Institute of Internal Auditors awards the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) designation, a globally accepted certification for internal auditors. The IIA has its global headquarters in Altamonte Springs, Florida, and has more than 170,000 members worldwide through 103 institutes and 153 chapters in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean (as of 2010).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Institute Of Internal Auditors - IIA'

Apart from internal auditing, IIA members also work in areas where this function is a critical component of the corporate structure. These areas include risk management, governance, internal control, information technology audit, education and security.

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