Insurance Fraud

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Insurance Fraud'

An illegal act on the part of either the buyer or seller of an insurance contract. Insurance fraud from the issuer (seller) includes selling policies from non-existent companies, failing to submit premiums and churning policies to create more commissions. Buyer fraud includes exaggerated claims, falsified medical history, post-dated policies, viatical fraud, faked death or kidnapping, murder and much more.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Insurance Fraud'

Insurance fraud is basically an attempt to exploit an insurance contract. Insurance is meant to protect against risks. It isn't meant to be a tool to enrich the insured. Although insurance fraud by the policy issuer still occurs, the majority of cases have to do with the policyholder attempting to receive more money by exaggerating a claim. More sensational instances such as faking one's own death or killing someone for the insurance money are comparatively rare.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Substandard Insurance

    An insurance policy issued to someone who does not qualify for ...
  2. Mortgage Fraud

    Intentionally falsifying information on a mortgage loan application. ...
  3. Corporate Fraud

    Activities undertaken by an individual or company that are done ...
  4. Securities Fraud

    A type of serious white-collar crime in which a person or company, ...
  5. Churning

    Excessive trading by a broker in a client's account largely to ...
  6. Life Insurance

    A protection against the loss of income that would result if ...
Related Articles
  1. Understanding Your Insurance Contract
    Insurance

    Understanding Your Insurance Contract

  2. Credit Scams To Watch Out For
    Insurance

    Credit Scams To Watch Out For

  3. 15 Insurance Policies You Don't Need
    Insurance

    15 Insurance Policies You Don't Need

  4. Top 10 Life Insurance Myths
    Insurance

    Top 10 Life Insurance Myths

Hot Definitions
  1. Leading Indicator

    A measurable economic factor that changes before the economy starts to follow a particular pattern or trend. Leading indicators ...
  2. Wage-Price Spiral

    A macroeconomic theory to explain the cause-and-effect relationship between rising wages and rising prices, or inflation. ...
  3. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years ...
  4. Call Risk

    The risk, faced by a holder of a callable bond, that a bond issuer will take advantage of the callable bond feature and redeem ...
  5. Parity Price

    When the price of an asset is directly linked to another price. Examples of parity price are: 1. Convertibles - the price ...
  6. Earnings Multiplier

    An adjustment made to a company's P/E ratio that takes into account current interest rates. The earnings multiplier is used ...
Trading Center