Intercontinental Exchange - ICE

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DEFINITION of 'Intercontinental Exchange - ICE'

A market based in Atlanta, Georgia that facilitates the electronic exchange of energy commodities. ICE operates completely as an electronic exchange, and it is linked directly to individuals and firms looking to trade in oil, natural gas, jet-fuel, emissions, electric power and commodity derivatives.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Intercontinental Exchange - ICE'

ICE was established in May 2000, and has been at the forefront of the commodities exchange market since then. The ICE network offers companies the ability to trade energy commodities with another company around the clock and spanning the globe. ICE also facilitates the exchange of emissions contracts and over-the-counter energy exchange.

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