Intercorporate Investment

DEFINITION of 'Intercorporate Investment'

Securities that are purchased by corporations rather than individual investors. Intercorporate investments allow a company to achieve higher growth rates compared to keeping all of its funds in cash. These investments can also be used for strategic purposes like forming a joint ventures or making acquisitions. Companies purchase securities from other companies, banks and governments in order to take advantage of the returns from these securities. Marketable securities that can readily be exchanged for cash, such as notes and stocks, are usually preferred for this type of investment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Intercorporate Investment'

Intercorporate investments are accounted for differently than other funds held by a company. Short-term investments that are expected to be turned into cash are considered current assets, while other investments are considered non-current assets. When companies buy intercorporate investments, dividend and interest revenue is reported on the income statement.

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