Interested Shareholder

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DEFINITION of 'Interested Shareholder'

A shareholder or association with beneficial ownership, whether direct or indirect, of enough voting stock to affect company decisions.

BREAKING DOWN 'Interested Shareholder'

The actual percentage of stock that a beneficial shareholder must own is dependent upon the state or country that the company is headquartered in. The percentage may vary substantially.

Typically, the range is around 20% of all outstanding shares.

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