Interim Earnings Per Share

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DEFINITION of 'Interim Earnings Per Share'

A measure of earnings calculated at a specified time, shorter than or before the end of year calculations. Interim earnings per share (EPS) can be calculated at any time, given the knowledge of number of outstanding shares and net income less any preferred dividends outstanding just as EPS is calculated at the time of reporting. A typical interim frequency is quarterly, and sometimes monthly.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Interim Earnings Per Share'

Interim earnings per share is useful to both individuals and companies when valuation is necessary. It allows investors the ability to extrapolate yearly earnings for the company instead of waiting for year end EPS reporting. For example, if a company reports quarterly EPS of $1, it might be possible (with adjustments) to extrapolate $4 per share yearly earnings and calculate valuation metrics from there.

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