Interim Statement

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Interim Statement'

A public financial report covering a period of less than one year. An interim statement is used to convey the performance of a company before the end of the year. Unlike annual statements, interim statements do not have to be audited. Interim statements increase communication between companies and the public, and provide investors with up-to-date information between annual reporting periods.


Also known as an interim report.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Interim Statement'

A quarterly report is an example of an interim statement because it is issued before year end.


The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) suggests certain standards to be followed for interim statements. These include a series of condensed statements covering the company's financial position, income, cash flows and changes in equity along with notes of explanation. The IASB also suggests that companies should follow the same guidelines in their interim statements as they use in preparing their annual reports, including using the same accounting methods.

RELATED TERMS
  1. All-Purpose Financial Statement

    A record of financial activity that is suitable for a variety ...
  2. Financial Statement Analysis

    The process of reviewing and evaluating a company's financial ...
  3. Cash Flow Statement

    One of the quarterly financial reports any publicly traded company ...
  4. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  5. Certified Financial Statement

    A financial statement, such as an income statement, cash flow ...
  6. Annual Report

    1. An annual publication that public corporations must provide ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Advanced Financial Statement Analysis

    Learn what it means to do your homework on a company's performance and reporting practices before investing.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    What is considered a good PEG (price to earnings growth) ratio?

    Learn about the price/earnings to growth (PEG) ratio and understand what investors and market analysts consider a good ratio for this valuation measure.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between profitability and profit?

    Calculating company profit and profitability are not one and the same, and investors should understand the difference between the two terms.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Should companies break out accounts receivables into subledgers?

    Find out why every company that sells on credit should break down its accounts receivable into individual customer subsidiary ledgers, or subledgers.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    How do you calculate operating cash flow in Excel?

    Lenders and investors can predict the success of a company by using the spreadsheet application Excel to calculate the free cash flow of companies.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Are taxes calculated in operating cash flow?

    Learn how taxes are involved with the calculations for operating cash flow, and find out about the importance of operational cash flow.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    What are the main benchmarks that track the oil & gas drilling sector?

    Read about several different types of benchmarks that investors can use to track the overall performance of the oil and gas drilling sector.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    What metrics can be used to evaluate companies in the forest products sector?

    Understand some of the best financial and equity valuation measurements that can be utilized to evaluate companies in the forest products sector.
  9. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What is the difference between yield to maturity and the yield to call?

    Determining various the various yields that callable bonds can provide investors is an important factor in the bond purchasing process.
  10. Investing

    What Happened To Obama’s Amnesty Bill?

    The sweeping Republican majorities were supposed to trigger change, but now they are preparing to embrace the Obama immigration policy.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  2. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  3. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  4. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  5. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  6. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
Trading Center