Interim Statement

What is an 'Interim Statement'

A public financial report covering a period of less than one year. An interim statement is used to convey the performance of a company before the end of the year. Unlike annual statements, interim statements do not have to be audited. Interim statements increase communication between companies and the public, and provide investors with up-to-date information between annual reporting periods.


Also known as an interim report.

BREAKING DOWN 'Interim Statement'

A quarterly report is an example of an interim statement because it is issued before year end.


The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) suggests certain standards to be followed for interim statements. These include a series of condensed statements covering the company's financial position, income, cash flows and changes in equity along with notes of explanation. The IASB also suggests that companies should follow the same guidelines in their interim statements as they use in preparing their annual reports, including using the same accounting methods.

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