Interim Statement

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Interim Statement'

A public financial report covering a period of less than one year. An interim statement is used to convey the performance of a company before the end of the year. Unlike annual statements, interim statements do not have to be audited. Interim statements increase communication between companies and the public, and provide investors with up-to-date information between annual reporting periods.


Also known as an interim report.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Interim Statement'

A quarterly report is an example of an interim statement because it is issued before year end.


The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) suggests certain standards to be followed for interim statements. These include a series of condensed statements covering the company's financial position, income, cash flows and changes in equity along with notes of explanation. The IASB also suggests that companies should follow the same guidelines in their interim statements as they use in preparing their annual reports, including using the same accounting methods.

RELATED TERMS
  1. All-Purpose Financial Statement

    A record of financial activity that is suitable for a variety ...
  2. Financial Statement Analysis

    The process of reviewing and evaluating a company's financial ...
  3. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  4. Annual Report

    1. An annual publication that public corporations must provide ...
  5. Cash Flow Statement

    One of the quarterly financial reports any publicly traded company ...
  6. Certified Financial Statement

    A financial statement, such as an income statement, cash flow ...
Related Articles
  1. Advanced Financial Statement Analysis
    Options & Futures

    Advanced Financial Statement Analysis

  2. Balance Sheet: Analyzing Owners' Equity
    Fundamental Analysis

    Balance Sheet: Analyzing Owners' Equity

  3. Reading The Balance Sheet
    Investing Basics

    Reading The Balance Sheet

  4. What Is Opportunity Cost And Why Does ...
    Economics

    What Is Opportunity Cost And Why Does ...

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option ...
  2. Odious Debt

    Money borrowed by one country from another country and then misappropriated by national rulers. A nation's debt becomes odious ...
  3. Takeover

    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for an acquiree. If the target company is publicly traded, the ...
  4. Harvest Strategy

    A strategy in which investment in a particular line of business is reduced or eliminated because the revenue brought in by ...
  5. Stop-Limit Order

    An order placed with a broker that combines the features of stop order with those of a limit order. A stop-limit order will ...
  6. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The ...
Trading Center