Interlisted Stock

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DEFINITION of 'Interlisted Stock'

A security that is listed on multiple stock exchanges. An interlisted stock could be a stock that trades on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Interlisted Stock'

Many companies have shares that trade on multiple exchanges. The advantages of listing on several exchanges is that it allows a company's shares to gain access to more investors and increases a company's liquidty. The main disadvantages include the cost of listing on numerous exchanges and possible additional regulatory requirements.

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