Intermarket Surveillance Group - ISG

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Intermarket Surveillance Group - ISG'

An international group consisting of North American, Asian and European exchanges that provides a framework for sharing information and coordinating regulatory efforts so as to address potential intermarket manipulations and trading irregularities. The intermarket surveillance group also provides a forum for discussing regulatory concerns that are common to its members, enabling them to discharge their regulatory responsibilities more efficiently. Generally the ISG meets three times per year.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Intermarket Surveillance Group - ISG'

The ISG was created in 1983 by the major U.S. exchanges in response to their growing need to share information. In 1990, an affiliate membership category was created to allow futures exchanges and non-US exchanges to join the group.

RELATED TERMS
  1. FINRA BrokerCheck

    An information vehicle containing statistics on both past and ...
  2. Nasdaq Intermarket

    An electronic marketplace where National Association of Securities ...
  3. Manipulation

    The act of artificially inflating or deflating the price of a ...
  4. Market Surveillance

    The prevention and investigation of abusive, manipulative or ...
  5. Short And Distort

    An illegal practice employed by unethical internet investors ...
  6. Inverse Transaction

    A transaction that can cancel out a forward contract that has ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are commodity spot prices different than futures prices?

    Commodity spot prices and futures prices are different quotes for different types of contracts. The spot price is the current ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do commodity spot prices indicate future price movements?

    Commodity spot prices indicate future price movements because commodity futures prices are calculated using spot prices. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Where did market to market (MTM) accounting come from?

    Mark to market accounting has been around in concept since the stock market began; however, it was not officially part of ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why is market to market (MTM) accounting considered controversial?

    Mark to market accounting has been an integral component of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) in the United ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between economic value and market value?

    The difference between market value and economic value is that the former represents the minimum amount the customer is willing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I set a strike price for a future?

    Strike prices can be set for put and call options, but investors engaged in futures contracts are obligated to trade the ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Top 8 Ways Companies Cook The Books

    Find out more about the fraudulent accounting methods some companies use to fool investors.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Spotting Creative Accounting On The Balance Sheet

    Companies have ways of manipulating their balance sheets that investors should be aware of.
  3. Retirement

    Common Clues Of Financial Statement Manipulation

    Search for the "bloody" fingerprints in accounting crimes.
  4. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  5. Active Trading Fundamentals

    The Short And Distort: Stock Manipulation In A Bear Market

    High-quality stock reports needn't be confused with stock manipulators' dramatic claims.
  6. Investing Basics

    What Does Spot Price Mean?

    Spot price is the current price at which a security may be bought or sold.
  7. Investing Basics

    What Does a Clearing House Do?

    A clearing house is a third-party agency or separate entity that acts as a go-between for buyers and sellers in financial markets.
  8. Investing Basics

    What is Meant by Implied Volatility?

    The estimated volatility of a security's price.
  9. Economics

    How Gloomy Headlines Support Eurozone Stocks

    It's hard to miss the many headlines on Europe lately with news ranging from Greece’s debt saga to the details of ongoing European Central Bank stimulus.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Credit Spread

    A credit spread has two different meanings, one referring to bonds, the other to options.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Radner Equilibrium

    A theory suggesting that if economic decision makers have unlimited computational capacity for choice among strategies, then ...
  2. Inbound Cash Flow

    Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow ...
  3. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  4. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  5. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  6. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!