Intermarket Surveillance Group - ISG

DEFINITION of 'Intermarket Surveillance Group - ISG'

An international group consisting of North American, Asian and European exchanges that provides a framework for sharing information and coordinating regulatory efforts so as to address potential intermarket manipulations and trading irregularities. The intermarket surveillance group also provides a forum for discussing regulatory concerns that are common to its members, enabling them to discharge their regulatory responsibilities more efficiently. Generally the ISG meets three times per year.

BREAKING DOWN 'Intermarket Surveillance Group - ISG'

The ISG was created in 1983 by the major U.S. exchanges in response to their growing need to share information. In 1990, an affiliate membership category was created to allow futures exchanges and non-US exchanges to join the group.

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