Intermodal Freight

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Intermodal Freight'

Products and raw materials that are placed in a container that can be transported by a variety of vehicles, such as container ships, semi-trailer trucks and trains. Containers designed for intermodal freight often adhere to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) dimension guidelines, allowing the freight to remain in the container when transfered between modes of transportation rather than being moved into a container of a different size.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Intermodal Freight'

The emergence of standardized shipping containers has allowed products and raw materials to travel faster and at a reduced cost. The United States military is often credited with the containerization of shipping during the 1950s, when Department of Defense standards were adopted by the ISO.

RELATED TERMS
  1. International Organization For ...

    The world's largest developer and published of international ...
  2. Dry Bulk Commodity

    A commodity which is shipped in large, unpackaged amounts. There ...
  3. Baltic Dry Index - BDI

    A shipping and trade index created by the London-based Baltic ...
  4. Raw Materials

    A material or substance used in the primary production or manufacturing ...
  5. Delivery

    The action by which an underlying commodity, security, cash value, ...
  6. Nordic Model

    The social welfare and economic systems adopted by Nordic countries.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What was the largest company Warren Buffett ever bought through Berkshire Hathaway?

    The largest acquisition that Warren Buffett has made through Berkshire Hathaway is the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the main factors that drive share prices in the railroads sector?

    Several factors drive the railroad industry and railroad company stock prices. As with most businesses, some factors can ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What types of assets and payments are recorded in the capital account?

    In terms of international trade and the balance of payments, the term "capital account" means different things in different ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can industrialization affect the national economy of less developed countries ...

    Industrialization – the period of transformation from an agricultural economy to an urban, mass-producing economy – has accompanied ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between consumer surplus and economic surplus?

    The consumer surplus is the difference between the highest price a consumer is willing to pay and the actual market price ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does it signify about a given product if the consumer surplus figure for that ...

    High consumer surplus for a particular product signifies a high level of utility for consumers and may carry some implications ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    5 Investment Risks Created By Global Warming

    Climate-change deniers and believers alike would be wise to prepare for the worst.
  2. Economics

    The Baltic Dry Index: Evaluating An Economic Recovery

    This index can provide insight into economic growth and production, but it has its critics.
  3. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  4. Economics

    Cashing In On Macroeconomic Trends

    Learn to identify the things that may impact your investments down the road.
  5. Economics

    China And The Maritime Silk Road

    We provide an overview of China's planned Maritime Silk Road.
  6. Forex Education

    What Is A Currency War & How Does It Work

    We look at what a currency war is, what factors may lead to it, the impacts of such a strategy, and whether there is a currency war currently.
  7. Economics

    What is a Capital Account?

    Capital account is an economic term that refers to the net change in investment and asset ownership for a nation.
  8. Economics

    Understanding the Fisher Effect

    The Fisher effect states that the real interest rate equals the nominal interest rate minus the expected inflation rate.
  9. Investing

    The Labor Market Recovery’s Missing Ingredient

    Job creation is running at the fastest pace since the 90s, and there is some evidence that wage growth is finally starting to accelerate, albeit modestly.
  10. Economics

    Gambling on Macau: Too Risky?

    Macau was once heralded as the new Las Vegas for casino investors. Is it too late?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Wash Trading

    The process of buying shares of a company through one broker while selling shares through a different broker. Wash trading ...
  2. Fixed-Income Arbitrage

    An investment strategy that attempts to profit from arbitrage opportunities in interest rate securities. When using a fixed-income ...
  3. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  4. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  5. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  6. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
Trading Center