IRR Rule

AAA

DEFINITION of 'IRR Rule'

A measure for evaluating whether to proceed with a project or investment. The IRR rule states that if the internal rate of return (IRR) on a project or investment is greater than the minimum required rate of return – the cost of capital – then the decision would generally be to go ahead with it. Conversely, if the IRR on a project or investment is lower than the cost of capital, then the best course of action may be to reject it.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'IRR Rule'

The higher the IRR on a project and the greater the amount by which it exceeds the cost of capital, the higher the net cash flows to the investor. In general terms, a company that has to choose one, among several similar projects with equivalent degrees of risk, may go with the one that provides the highest IRR.





The IRR rule is one among a number of rules used to evaluate projects in capital budgeting. However, it may not always be rigidly enforced. For example, a company may prefer a project with a lower IRR over one with a higher IRR because the former provides other intangible benefits such as being part of a bigger strategic plan or impeding competition. A company may also prefer a larger project with a lower IRR to a much smaller project with a higher IRR, because of the higher cash flows generated by the larger project.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Internal Rate Of Return - IRR

    A metric used in capital budgeting measuring the profitability ...
  2. Net Present Value - NPV

    The difference between the present values of cash inflows and ...
  3. Hurdle Rate

    The minimum rate of return on a project or investment required ...
  4. Discounted Cash Flow - DCF

    A valuation method used to estimate the attractiveness of an ...
  5. Capital Budgeting

    The process in which a business determines whether projects such ...
  6. Modified Internal Rate Of Return ...

    While the internal rate of return (IRR) assumes the cash flows ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Breaking Down The Fed Model

    Learn what pundits mean when they say that stocks are undervalued according to the Fed model.
  2. Forex Education

    Time Value Of Money: Determining Your Future Worth

    Determining monthly contributions to college funds, retirement plans or savings is easy with this calculation.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    Internal Rate Of Return: An Inside Look

    Use this method to choose which project or investment is right for you.
  4. Home & Auto

    4 Areas to Consider Roofing Material Types

    Roofing your home is very important, that’s why you should choose a roof specifically designed to handle your area’s climate.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: WisdomTree SmallCap Earnings

    Discover the WisdomTree Small Cap Earnings ETF, a fund with a special focus on small-cap and micro-cap stocks with positive earnings.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares US Regional Banks

    Obtain information and analysis of the iShares US Regional Banks ETF for investors seeking particular exposure to regional bank stocks.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: PowerShares S&P 500 Low Volatility

    Find out about the PowerShares S&P 500 Low Volatility ETF, and learn detailed information about this fund that provides exposure to low-volatility stocks.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: SPDR Barclays Short Term Corp Bd

    Learn about the SPDR Barclays Short-Term Corporate Bond ETF, and explore detailed analysis of the exchange-traded fund tracking U.S. short-term corporate bonds.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Vanguard Intermediate-Term Bond

    Find out about the Vanguard Intermediate-Term Bond ETF, and delve into detailed analysis of this fund that invests in investment-grade intermediate-term bonds.
  10. Technical Indicators

    Key Financial Ratios to Analyze the Mining Industry

    Discover some the most important financial ratios used by investors and analysts to evaluate companies in the metals and mining industry.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What's the difference between net present value and internal rate of return? How ...

    Both of these measurements are primarily used in capital budgeting, the process by which companies determine whether a new ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Which is a better measure for capital budgeting, IRR or NPV?

    In capital budgeting, there are a number of different approaches that can be used to evaluate any given project, and each ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the formula for calculating compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in Excel?

    The compound annual growth rate, or CAGR for short, measures the return on an investment over a certain period of time. Below ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the formula for calculating weighted average cost of capital (WACC) in Excel?

    When analyzing different financing options, companies need to look at how much it will cost to fund operations. There are ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What assumptions are made when conducting a t-test?

    The common assumptions made when doing a t-test include those regarding the scale of measurement, random sampling, normality ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  2. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  3. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
  4. Widow's Exemption

    In general terms, a widow's exemption refers to the amount that can be deducted from taxable income by a widow, thereby reducing ...
  5. Wedding Warrant

    A warrant that can only be exercised if the host asset, typically a bond or preferred stock, is surrendered. Until the call ...
  6. Marlboro Friday

    A reference to Friday, April 2, 1993, when Philip Morris, the maker of Marlboro cigarettes, announced that it would be cutting ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!