Internal Audit


DEFINITION of 'Internal Audit'

The examination, monitoring and analysis of activities related to a company's operation, including its business structure, employee behavior and information systems. An internal audit is designed to review what a company is doing in order to identify potential threats to the organization's health and profitability, and to make suggestions for mitigating the risk associated with those threats in order to minimize costs.

BREAKING DOWN 'Internal Audit'

Regulations, such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, have increased corporate requirements for performing internal audits. They are important components of a company's risk management, as they help companies identify issues before they become substantial problems. They also help identify risky behavior by individual employees and threats posed by outside parties, such as attempts to steal intellectual property.

  1. Audit

    An unbiased examination and evaluation of the financial statements ...
  2. Horizontal Audit

    An evaluation of one process or activity across several groups ...
  3. Audit Cycle

    The accounting process that auditors employ in the review of ...
  4. Certified Internal Auditor - CIA

    A certification offered to accountants who conduct internal audits. ...
  5. Independent Auditor

    A certified public accountant who examines the financial records ...
  6. Corporate Governance

    The system of rules, practices and processes by which a company ...
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  1. What's the average salary of an audit clerk?

    Audit clerks, along with bookkeepers and accountants, earn an average salary of $35,170 per year, which is the equivalent ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>

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