Internal Controls


DEFINITION of 'Internal Controls'

Methods put in place by a company to ensure the integrity of financial and accounting information, meet operational and profitability targets and transmit management policies throughout the organization.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Internal Controls'

Internal controls work best when they are applied to multiple divisions and deal with the interactions between the various business departments. No two systems of internal controls are identical, but many core philosophies regarding financial integrity and accounting practices have become standard management practices.

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  5. Do dividends affect working capital?

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