Internal Growth Rate

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DEFINITION of 'Internal Growth Rate'

The highest level of growth achievable for a business without obtaining outside financing. A firm's maximum internal growth rate is the level at which growth from general business operations can continue to fund and grow the company. For startup firms and small business the internal growth rate is an important ratio to follow, since it measures a firm's profitable increase in top-line revenues.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Internal Growth Rate'

The internal growth rate for a public company can simply be derived by taking a company's retained earnings and dividing by total assets. Measuring internal growth rate using retained earnings may not be the best approach for private and small firms, as tax implications may limit the retained earnings kept on the balance sheet. Using a ratio of net cash flow to working capital would be more advisable, in such instances

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