International Bank Of Reconstruction And Development - IBRD

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DEFINITION of 'International Bank Of Reconstruction And Development - IBRD'

A component of the United Nation's World Bank Group that was established in 1945 with the original mandate of providing funding towards the post-World War II rebuilding efforts. In the modern era, the IBRD's main objective is to provide loans and other financial services to less fortunate countries in hopes of reducing global poverty.

BREAKING DOWN 'International Bank Of Reconstruction And Development - IBRD'

The IBRD raises captial for the loans via the issuance of AAA rated bonds. Around $10-15 billion worth of bonds are issued on an annual basis. The IBRD has had its AAA credit rating since 1959.

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