International Chamber Of Commerce - ICC

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DEFINITION of 'International Chamber Of Commerce - ICC'

The largest, and arguably most diverse, business organization in the world with thousands of member companies representing over 130 countries and a vast array of business interests. The International Chamber Of Commerce (ICC) has a worldwide network of committees and industry experts to keep members abreast of the issues that may affect them, as well as contacts within the World Trade Organization, the United Nations and other intergovernmental agencies.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Chamber Of Commerce - ICC'

Founded in 1919 in Paris, France, the International Chamber of Commerce seeks to foster international trade and commerce, as well as to protect and promote open markets for goods and services, along with the free flow of capital. The ICC also battles corruption and commercial crime to foster more economic growth, job creation and prosperity.

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