International Reserves

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DEFINITION of 'International Reserves'

Any kind of reserve funds that can be passed between the central banks of different countries. International reserves are an acceptable form of payment between these banks. The reserves themselves can either be gold or else a specific currency, such as the dollar or euro.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Reserves'

International reserves are also used by countries to back liabilities such as any local currency that has been issued as well as bank deposits. Special drawing rights are another form of international reserves. It was created by the International Monetary Fund to supplement the existing reserves of member countries.

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