International Bond

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DEFINITION of 'International Bond'

Debt investments that are issued in a country by a non-domestic entity. International bonds are issued in countries outside of the United States, in their native country's currency. They pay interest at specific intervals, and pay the principal amount back to the bond's buyer at maturity.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Bond'

International bonds include eurobonds, foreign bonds and global bonds. A different type of international bond is the Brady bond, which is issued in U.S. currency. Brady bonds are issued in order to help developing countries better manage their international debt. International bonds are also private corporate bonds issued by companies in foreign countries, and many mutual funds in the United States hold these bonds.

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