International Bond

AAA

DEFINITION of 'International Bond'

Debt investments that are issued in a country by a non-domestic entity. International bonds are issued in countries outside of the United States, in their native country's currency. They pay interest at specific intervals, and pay the principal amount back to the bond's buyer at maturity.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Bond'

International bonds include eurobonds, foreign bonds and global bonds. A different type of international bond is the Brady bond, which is issued in U.S. currency. Brady bonds are issued in order to help developing countries better manage their international debt. International bonds are also private corporate bonds issued by companies in foreign countries, and many mutual funds in the United States hold these bonds.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Kiwi Bond

    Retail stock offered directly to the public and available only ...
  2. Samurai Bond

    A yen-denominated bond issued in Tokyo by a non-Japanese company ...
  3. Eurobond

    A bond issued in a currency other than the currency of the country ...
  4. Yankee Bond

    A bond denominated in U.S. dollars that is publicly issued in ...
  5. Bulldog Bond

    A type of bond purchased by buyers interested in earning a revenue ...
  6. Sushi Bond

    A bond issued by a Japanese issuer in a market outside Japan ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. When should a company consider issuing a corporate bond vs. issuing stock?

    A company should consider issuing a corporate bond versus issuing stock after it has already exhausted all internal forms ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is a corporate bond taxed?

    A corporate bond is taxed through the interest earned on the bond, through capital gains or losses earned in the early sale ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What percentage of an electronics company's spending is typically spent on research ...

    The average amount of spending allocated to research and development in the electronics sector is approximately 7-8%. However, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do I use the principles of convexity to compare bonds?

    Convexity, along with another principle known as duration, is an important consideration when assessing bond risk. All else ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is affected by the interest rate risk?

    Interest rate risk is the risk that arises when the absolute level of interest rates fluctuate. Interest rate risk directly ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I calculate the carrying value of a bond?

    The carrying value of a bond is the net amount between the bond’s face value and any unamortized premiums or minus any amortized ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Bonds: They're Not Just For Seniors

    In this article, we'll show you how investors at any stage of life can keep these fixed-income investments. Keep Reading.
  2. Investing Basics

    Broadening Your Portfolio's Borders

    Find out what type of international fund might suit your needs in gaining exposure to foreign markets.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Getting Into International Investing

    Diversifying can mean not only investing in various asset classes but also venturing beyond domestic exchanges.
  4. Options & Futures

    Spice Up Your Portfolio With International Bonds

    Going global can add flavor and diversity to an otherwise bland basket of bonds.
  5. Economics

    What Is An Emerging Market Economy?

    Emerging markets provide new investment opportunities, but there are risks - both to residents and foreign investors.
  6. Retirement

    Bond Basics Tutorial

    Investing in bonds - What are they, and do they belong in your portfolio?
  7. Bonds & Fixed Income

    How Are Zero-Coupon Municipal Bonds Taxed?

    What every investor needs to know about taxes and zero-coupon muni bonds.
  8. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Muni Bonds, Taxable Bonds or CDs: Which is Best?

    Here's how to tell if municipal bonds are a better investment than taxable bonds or CDs.
  9. Chart Advisor

    Long-Term Charts Suggest The Next Move Is Downward

    It is often a strategic move to remove oneself from the daily fluctuations and to broaden the time horizon to get a better idea of the long-term trend.
  10. Economics

    Explaining the Human Development Index

    The Human Development Index (HDI) is a metric developed by the United Nations to take the emphasis off economic growth and focus on human wellbeing.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Mixed Economic System

    An economic system that features characteristics of both capitalism and socialism.
  2. Net Worth

    The amount by which assets exceed liabilities. Net worth is a concept applicable to individuals and businesses as a key measure ...
  3. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  4. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  5. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  6. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
Trading Center