DEFINITION of 'Internote'

Corporate debt securities that are designed to allow ease of purchase by individual investors. Internotes reflect the issued debt of the underlying entity which allows retail investors to gain access to bank, corporate or government bonds. Internotes are usually unsecured and have a minimum investment of $1000.


Internotes carry credit and secondary market risk. They have a starting price, known as par. If $1000 worth of bonds are purchased, at maturity the initial amount is returned with accumulated interest. They are offered for one week starting on Monday and have separate CUSIP numbers based on the specific terms. These terms could include the maturity, call provisions or coupons.

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