In The Pink

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DEFINITION of 'In The Pink'

An informal expression used to describe a situation in which an investor or an economy is in a good financial position. More generally, it refers to being in the best of health or condition.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'In The Pink'

Blue chip stocks and healthy economies are examples of in-the-pink (or rosy) financial positions.

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