Inventory Accounting

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DEFINITION of 'Inventory Accounting'

The body of accounting that deals with valuing and accounting for changes in inventoried assets. Changes in value can occur for a number of reasons including depreciation, deterioration, obsolescence, change in customer taste, increased demand, decreased market supply and so on.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Inventory Accounting'

It is a requirement of GAAP that inventory be properly accounted for according to a very particular set of standards, so as to limit the potential of overstating profit by understating inventory value, and to limit the potential to overstate a company's value by overstating the value of inventory which has in fact materially depreciated in value.

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