Invested Capital

What is 'Invested Capital'

Invested capital is the total amount of money that was endowed into a company by the shareholders, bondholders and all other interested parties. Invested capital is often determined by adding the total debt and lease obligations to the amount of equity in the firm and then subtracting the non-operating cash and investments. Invested capital must be calculated, and there are multiple ways to calculate this figure. It will not be listed on the company's financial statement.

BREAKING DOWN 'Invested Capital'

Companies must earn more than it costs them to use the invested capital provided by bondholders, shareholders and other financing sources, in order to earn an economic profit. Knowing a company's invested capital allows investors to use this metric to calculate measures of performance such as return on invested capital, economic value added and return on capital employed.

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