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DEFINITION of 'Investment Center'

A business unit that can utilize capital to directly contribute to a company's profitability. Companies evaluate the performance of an investment center according to the revenues it brings in through investments in capital assets compared to the overall expenses.


An investment center is sometimes called an investment division.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Investment Center'

An investment center is different than a cost center, which indirectly adds profit and is evaluated according to the money it takes to operate. Moreover, unlike a profit center, investment centers can utilize capital in order to purchase other assets. Because of this complexity, companies have to use a variety of metrics, including return on investment (ROI), residual income and economic value added (EVA) to evaluate performance.

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