Investment Securities

What are 'Investment Securities'

Investment securities are securities that are purchased in order to be held for investment. This is in contrast to securities that are purchased by a broker-dealer or other intermediary for resale. Banks often purchase marketable securities to hold in their portfolios.

BREAKING DOWN 'Investment Securities'

Investment securities held by banks are usually one of two main sources of revenue, along with loans. Investment securities provide banks with a source of liquidity along with the profits from realized capital gains when they are sold.

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