Investment Climate

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DEFINITION of 'Investment Climate'

The economic and financial conditions in a country that affect whether individuals and businesses are willing to lend money and acquire a stake in the businesses operating there. Investment climate is affected by many factors, including: poverty, crime, infrastructure, workforce, national security, political instability, regime uncertainty, taxes, rule of law, property rights, government regulations, government transparency and government accountability.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Investment Climate'

An unfavorable investment climate is one of the many hindrances faced by underdeveloped nations. Regulatory reform is often a key component of removing the barriers to investment. A number of nonprofit organizations have been established for the purpose of improving the investment climate and spurring economic development in these countries. Also, some investors are willing to take on the high level of risk and volatility associated with investing in an unfavorable climate because of the potential that the high risk will be rewarded with high returns.

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