Investment Company

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DEFINITION of 'Investment Company'

A corporation or trust engaged in the business of investing the pooled capital of investors in financial securities. This is most often done either through a closed-end fund or an open-end fund (also referred to as a mutual fund). In the U.S., most investment companies are registered with and regulated by the Securities & Exchange Commission under the Investment Company Act of 1940.

Also known as "fund company" or "fund sponsor".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Investment Company'

Investment companies are business entities, both privately and publicly owned, that manage, sell, and market funds to the public. They typically offer investors a variety of funds and investment services, which include portfolio management, recordkeeping, custodial, legal, accounting and tax management services.

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