Investment Company Institute - ICI

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DEFINITION

Founded in 1940, the Investment Company Institute, based in Washington, D.C., is the national trade association of U.S. investment companies, which includes mutual funds, closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds and unit investment trusts.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The ICI encourages high ethical standards for all industry participants, advances the interests of its members, promotes public understanding of the fund industry and undertakes statistical studies and research on matters related to the fund business. The ICI publishes an annual "Fact Book" in May. It provides a comprehensive review of trends, activities and statistics on mutual funds, exchange-traded funds and closed-end funds.


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