Investment Objective

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DEFINITION of 'Investment Objective'

A client information form used by registered investment advisors and other asset managers that aids in determining the optimal portfolio mix for the client. An investment objective survey may come in the form of a questionnaire, where the investor will be asked things such as:

-Current liquid and net worth
-Risk aversion
-Investing time horizon
-Income levels
-Expense levels
-Planned bequeathments and/or charitable contributions
-Restrictions on security selection

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Investment Objective'

An investment objective will typically not be completed by the investor until he or she has decided to use the services of the asset manager because this information is highly sensitive and is kept confidential. Portfolio managers will use the information obtained in an investment objective form to help create a customized portfolio within the client's risk profile. This form will be kept current as the client's goals change over the years, with new information being implemented into the client's portfolio and/or retirement plan.

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