Investment Pyramid

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DEFINITION of 'Investment Pyramid'

A portfolio strategy that allocates assets according to the relative safety and soundness of investments. The bottom of the pyramid is comprised of low-risk investments, the mid-portion is composed of growth investments and the top is speculative investments.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Investment Pyramid'

The base (the widest part of the pyramid) would contain government bonds and money market securities, stocks would make up the middle of pyramid and then the top would be options and futures. Thus, the higher you go up the pyramid, the greater the risk and the potential return.

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