Investopedia

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DEFINITION of 'Investopedia'

One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers and financial professionals who seek guidance or research on various topics. The website publishes articles on investments, insurance, retirement, estate and college planning, consumer debt and an assortment of other educational material.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Investopedia'

Investopedia was purchased by Forbes Publishing in 2007 and then later by ValueClick, Inc. in 2010. Although Investopedia started as a source for financial terms, it has expanded to bring timely stock analysis and financial news material to users. New investors can open a free stock or forex simulator account before entering the market with real funds.

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