Investor Relations - IR

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DEFINITION of 'Investor Relations - IR'

A department, present in most medium to large public companies, that provides investors with an accurate account of the company's affairs. This helps investors to make informed buy or sell decisions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Investor Relations - IR'

A company's investor relations department serves as a bridge for providing market intelligence to corporate management.

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