Invisible Trade

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DEFINITION of 'Invisible Trade '

Business transactions that occur with no exchange of tangible goods. Invisible trade involves the transfer of non-tangible goods and/or services, including customer service, intellectual property and patents. The items involved in invisible trade are associated with a value and can be exchanged for tangible goods.

BREAKING DOWN 'Invisible Trade '

By contrast, visible trade involves the exchange, or the import and export, of tangible goods. Examples of invisible trade include consulting, income from foreign investments, shipping services and tourism. Invisible trade represents an increasing percentage of world trade.

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