Invisible Supply

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DEFINITION of 'Invisible Supply'

Physical stocks of a commodity that are available for delivery upon futures contracts, but whose quantities cannot be accurately identified.

BREAKING DOWN 'Invisible Supply'

The invisible supply of commodities underlying futures contracts can be found in the hands of different manufacturers, producers, and wholesalers. Because this lump of goods is located outside of conventional commercial channels, accurate accounting for the quantities available is difficult.

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RELATED FAQS
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    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
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