International Organization Of Securities Commissions - IOSCO


DEFINITION of 'International Organization Of Securities Commissions - IOSCO'

A global cooperative of securities regulatory agencies that aims to establish and maintain worldwide standards for efficient, orderly and fair markets. The stated goals of the IOSCO are to:

-Promote high standards of regulation for the sake of orderly and efficient markets
-Share information with exchanges and assist assist them with technical and operational issues
-Establish standards toward monitoring global investment transactions across borders and markets

BREAKING DOWN 'International Organization Of Securities Commissions - IOSCO'

The IOSCO currently operates in more than 100 jurisdictions, covering more than 90% of the world's markets, and is considered to be the source for global standards of market operation. In 1998, it approved the IOSCO Principles, which set the benchmark for securities markets worldwide. The IOSCO has since released a methodology for how to achieve those benchmarks. The IOSCO's work has been praised at the highest levels of government, especially in the aftermath of 9/11, as transactions between different countries became something that required increased scrutiny and regulatory control.

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