Industrial Production Index - IPI


DEFINITION of 'Industrial Production Index - IPI'

An economic indicator that is released monthly by the Federal Reserve Board. The indicator measures the amount of output from the manufacturing, mining, electric and gas industries. The reference year for the index is 2002 and a level of 100.

BREAKING DOWN 'Industrial Production Index - IPI'

Production data is often received directly from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and trade associations, both on physical output and inputs used in the production process. Each individual index is calculated using the Fischer index formula.

Investors can use the IPI of various industries to examine the growth in the respective industry. If the IPI is growing month-over-month for a particular industry, this is a sign that the companies in the industry are performing well.

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