IPO Lock-Up

AAA

DEFINITION of 'IPO Lock-Up'

A contractual caveat referring to a period of time after a company has initially gone public, usually between 90 to 180 days. During these initial days of trading, company insiders or those holding majority stakes in the company are forbidden to sell any of their shares. Once the lock-up period ends, most trading restrictions are removed.

Also referred to as "lock-up period".

VIDEO

Loading the player...

BREAKING DOWN 'IPO Lock-Up'

An IPO lock-up is done so that the market is not flooded with too much supply of a company's stock too quickly. Typically, only 20% of the outstanding shares are initially offered to the investing public. A single large shareholder trying to unload all of his holdings in the first week of trading could send the stock downward, to the detriment of all shareholders.

There is also empirical evidence suggesting that after the end of the lock-up period, stock prices experience a permanent drop of about 1-3%.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Red Herring

    A preliminary prospectus filed by a company with the Securities ...
  2. Forced Initial Public Offering ...

    An instance in which a company is forced into issuing shares ...
  3. Follow On Public Offer - FPO

    An issuing of shares to investors by a public company that is ...
  4. Pre-IPO Placement

    When a portion of an initial public offering (IPO) is placed ...
  5. Greenshoe Option

    A provision contained in an underwriting agreement that gives ...
  6. Initial Public Offering - IPO

    The first sale of stock by a private company to the public. IPOs ...
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Interpreting A Company's IPO Prospectus Report

    Learn to decipher the secret language of the IPO prospectus report - it can tell you a lot about a company's future.
  2. Investing Basics

    5 Tips For Investing In IPOs

    Thinking of investing in IPOs? Here are five things to remember before jumping into these murky waters.
  3. Investing Basics

    IPO Lock-Ups Stop Insider Selling

    Ownership plays a key role when companies go public. Find out how.
  4. Retirement

    IPO Basics Tutorial

    What's an IPO, and how did everybody get so rich off them during the dotcom boom? We give you the scoop.
  5. Investing

    Career Choice: Bulge Bracket Vs. Boutique Bank

    Bulge bracket banks offer higher salaries and prestige. But boutique banks are rapidly gaining market share and may offer better work/life balance and job security.
  6. Investing Basics

    If You Had Invested Right After Amazon's IPO

    Find out how much you would have made if you had invested $1,000 during Amazon's IPO, including how the power of the stock split affects investment growth.
  7. Personal Finance

    Careers: Equity Research Vs. Investment Banking

    Equity research is sometimes viewed as the unglamorous, lower-paid cousin to investment banking. In this article, we compare the two careers.
  8. Stock Analysis

    Morgan Stanley's Profitablity: Bank on It (MS)

    The economy offers few certainties, but Morgan Stanley's profitability might be one of them.
  9. Investing

    Jamie Dimon Biography

    Jamie Dimon must be the most fearless man on Wall Street.
  10. Investing

    7 Reasons You Will Make a Good Investment Banker

    Many seek at the door of investment banking, but few can enter. Possessing these seven traits will help you land a job and succeed in investment banking.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How can average investors get involved in an IPO?

    An initial public offering, or IPO, is the first sale of stock by a new company, usually a private company trying to go ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does investment banking differ from commercial banking?

    Investment banking and commercial banking are two primary segments of the banking industry. Investment banks facilitate the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What kind of assets can be traded on a secondary market?

    Virtually all types of financial assets and investing instruments are traded on secondary markets, including stocks, bonds, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why would a company decide to utilize H-shares over A-shares in its IPO?

    A company would decide to utilize H shares over A shares in its initial public offering (IPO) if that company believes it ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do I place a buy limit order if I want to buy a stock during an initial public ...

    During an initial public offering, or IPO, a trader may place a buy limit order by choosing "Buy" and "Limit" in the order ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do corporate actions affect floating stock?

    Corporate actions, defined as a company's actions that affect the amount of outstanding company stock shares, can either ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  2. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  3. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  4. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  5. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
  6. Widow's Exemption

    In general terms, a widow's exemption refers to the amount that can be deducted from taxable income by a widow, thereby reducing ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!