IRS Publication 5 - Your Appeal Rights And How To Prepare A Protest If You Don't Agree

DEFINITION of 'IRS Publication 5 - Your Appeal Rights And How To Prepare A Protest If You Don't Agree'

A document published by the Internal Revenue Service outlining the procedure taxpayers are to follow if they disagree with IRS findings. Taxpayers have the right to request a meeting, conducted either in-person or over the telephone, with the supervisor of the IRS employee who issued the findings. If the meeting does not resolve the dispute, the taxpayer can appeal the case. Appealing the case may require a written letter of protest outlining why the taxpayer doesn't agree with the IRS findings.

BREAKING DOWN 'IRS Publication 5 - Your Appeal Rights And How To Prepare A Protest If You Don't Agree'

In most cases, taxpayers who don't reach an agreement at the appeals conference may be eligible to take their case to court. When in court, taxpayers can either represent themselves or hire a CPA, attorney or an enrolled agent. If the tax appeals court discovers that the taxpayer has filed a frivolous lawsuit, it can fine the taxpayer upwards of $25,000.

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