International Swaps and Derivatives Association - ISDA

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DEFINITION of 'International Swaps and Derivatives Association - ISDA'

An association created by the private negotiated derivatives market that represents participating parties. This association helps to improve the private negotiated derivatives market by identifying and reducing risks in the market.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Swaps and Derivatives Association - ISDA'

Created in 1985, the ISDA has members from institutions around the world. It was created to improve the private negotiated derivatives market by making it easier for the institutions that deal in the market to network.

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