Ishikawa Diagram

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Ishikawa Diagram'

A diagram that shows the causes of an event and is often used in manufacturing and product development to outline the different steps in a process, demonstrate where quality control issues might arise and determine which resources are required at specific times. The Ishikawa diagram was developed by Kaoru Ishikawa during the 1960s as a way of measuring quality control processes in the shipbuilding industry.


Also referred to as a "fish bone diagram" or "cause-and-effect diagram".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Ishikawa Diagram'

Ishikawa diagrams are sometimes referred to as "fish bone" diagrams because they resemble a fish skeleton, with the "ribs" representing the causes of an event and the final outcome appearing at the head of the skeleton. The purpose of the Ishikawa diagram is to allow management to determine which issues have to be addressed in order to gain or avoid a particular event.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Quality Management

    The act of overseeing all activities and tasks needed to maintain ...
  2. ISO 9000

    A series of international guidelines for quality control. ISO ...
  3. Six Sigma

    A quality-control program developed in 1986 by Motorola. Initially, ...
  4. Japan Inc.

    A nickname for the corporate world of Japan that came about during ...
  5. Kaizen

    A philosophy that sees improvement in productivity as a gradual ...
  6. BCG Growth Share Matrix

    A planning tool that uses graphical representations of a company’s ...
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    Great Company Or Growing Industry?

    Look at the big picture when choosing a company - what you see may really be a stage in its industry's growth.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Vital Link: Manufacturing And Economic Recovery

    Manufacturing output is one of the clearest signs that an economy is recovering from a recession.
  3. Insurance

    Understanding Japanese Keiretsu

    The structure of major companies in Japan is steeped in tradition and relationships.
  4. Investing

    Doing More With Less: The Sales-Per-Employee Ratio

    If used properly, this ratio can give you insight into a company's productivity and financial health.
  5. In recent years, companies have discovered that there are limits to the gains created by having all major business activities in one organization.
    Investing Basics

    Why do companies decide to unbundle their lines of business?

    In recent years, companies have discovered that there are limits to the gains created by having all major business activities in one organization.
  6. Investing

    How do name-brand products compete with their generic competitors?

    On April 2, 1993, Phillip Morris announced that it was cutting the price of its cigarettes to compete with the growing number of generic brands selling for much less. The announcement had an ...
  7. Economics

    The Nash Equilibrium

    Nash Equilibrium is a key concept of game theory, which helps explain how people and groups approach complex decisions. Named after renowned mathematician John Nash, the idea of Nash Equilibrium ...
  8. Investing Basics

    The Basics Of A Financial Analysis Report

    Running financial analysis on a company or industry is a key skill every investor must learn and understand how to undertake without which an ineffective financial report and investment recommendation ...
  9. Economics

    How Education And Training Affect The Economy

    Education and training benefit not only the worker, but also the employer and the country as a whole.
  10. Active Trading

    Viewing The Market As Organized Chaos

    Find out how a cat and a ladybug prove markets are both random and efficient.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Deferred Revenue

    Advance payments or unearned revenue, recorded on the recipient's balance sheet as a liability, until the services have been ...
  2. Multinational Corporation - MNC

    A corporation that has its facilities and other assets in at least one country other than its home country. Such companies ...
  3. SWOT Analysis

    A tool that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization. Specifically, SWOT is a basic, ...
  4. Simple Interest

    A quick method of calculating the interest charge on a loan. Simple interest is determined by multiplying the interest rate ...
  5. Special Administrative Region - SAR

    Unique geographical areas with a high degree of autonomy set up by the People's Republic of China. The Special Administrative ...
  6. Annual Percentage Rate - APR

    The annual rate that is charged for borrowing (or made by investing), expressed as a single percentage number that represents ...
Trading Center