ISLM Model

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DEFINITION of 'ISLM Model'

A macroeconomic model that graphically represents two intersecting curves, called the IS and LM curves. The investment/saving (IS) curve is a variation of the income-expenditure model incorporating market interest rates (demand for this model), while the liquidity preference/money supply equilibrium (LM) curve represents the amount of money available for investing (supply for this model).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'ISLM Model'

The model attempts to explain the investing decisions made by investors given the amount of money they have available and the interest rate they will receive. Equilibrium occurs when the amount of money invested equals the amount of money available for investing.

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