ISO 14000



A set of rules and norms for environmental management of industrial production. ISO 14000 applies to all businesses and is designed to reduce environmental damage and industrial waste. The ultimate goal of these guidelines is to promote useful and usable tools to businesses to help them manage their environmental impact.


ISO 14000 has several subsets that address various aspects of environmental regulations. These rules were all created by the Industrial Organization for Standardization. They first became popular in Europe and then began to be widely used in the U.S. in the 1990s.

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