ISO 14001



One of the subsets of ISO 14000. ISO 14001 pertains specifically to the requirements for using the ISO 14000 rules and the guidance for their use. These rules address how to use the best universal practices when adopting an environmental management system.


The ISO 14000 rules are a series of guidelines set forth by the International Organization for Standardization. These rules are designed to decrease pollution and reduce industrial waste. The latest version of ISO 14001 was released in 2004 by the ISO.

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