ISO 9000

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DEFINITION of 'ISO 9000'

A series of international guidelines for quality control. ISO 9000 pertains specifically to the criteria that needs to be met during the manufacturing process. These guidelines do not guarantee product quality, but merely the standards used in the production of goods.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'ISO 9000'

ISO rules and guidelines were established by the International Organization for Standardization. These rules first gained popularity in Europe, then spread to America in the 1990s. The certification process for this standard takes over a year and requires substantial documentation and demonstration.

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