ISO Currency Code

A A A

DEFINITION

Three-letter alphabetic codes that represent the various currencies used throughout the world. ISO Currency Codes are specified by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), which provides standards for businesses, governments and societies. They are maintained by the ISO 4217 Maintenance agency: SIX Interbank Clearing Ltd, of Zurich, Switzerland, acts as the ISO 4217 Maintenance Agency on behalf of the ISO and its Swiss member SNV (Swiss Association for Standardization).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

ISO currency code standards are periodically updated and published. Examples of ISO currency codes include the three-letter codes for the euro (EUR); U.S. dollar (USD); pound sterling (GBP); Japanese yen (JPY); Australian dollar (AUD); Swiss franc (CHF); and New Zealand dollar (NZD). These codes are used in foreign exchange markets, such as forex and currency futures. Each of the three-letter alphabetic codes have a corresponding three-digit numeric code. For example, the three-digit numeric code for the U.S. dollar (USD) is 840.


RELATED TERMS
  1. Exchange Rate

    The price of a nation’s currency in terms of another currency. An exchange rate ...
  2. ISO 14001

    One of the subsets of ISO 14000. ISO 14001 pertains specifically to the requirements ...
  3. ISO 9000

    A series of international guidelines for quality control. ISO 9000 pertains ...
  4. ISO 14000

    A set of rules and norms for environmental management of industrial production. ...
  5. Currency

    A generally accepted form of money, including coins and paper notes, which is ...
  6. Forex - FX

    The market in which currencies are traded. The forex market is the largest, ...
  7. Cash-And-Carry Trade

    A trading strategy in which an investor buys a long position in a security or ...
  8. ISDA Master Agreement

    A standard agreement used in over-the-counter derivatives transactions.
  9. Circus Swap

    A combination of an interest rate swap and a currency swap in which a fixed-rate ...
  10. Domestic Box Office Receipt (DBOR) ...

    Futures contracts based on movie receipts at the box-office. Domestic Box Office ...
Related Articles
  1. Getting Started In Foreign Exchange ...
    Forex Education

    Getting Started In Foreign Exchange ...

  2. Forex: Wading Into The Currency Market
    Forex Education

    Forex: Wading Into The Currency Market

  3. Top 7 Questions About Currency Trading ...
    Forex Education

    Top 7 Questions About Currency Trading ...

  4. Seasonal Trends In The Forex Market
    Forex Education

    Seasonal Trends In The Forex Market

  5. What is foreign exchange?
    Forex

    What is foreign exchange?

  6. Top 10 Forex Trading Rules
    Forex Education

    Top 10 Forex Trading Rules

  7. What the best way to play backwardation ...
    Active Trading Fundamentals

    What the best way to play backwardation ...

  8. The Role Of Speculators In The Commodity ...
    Investing Basics

    The Role Of Speculators In The Commodity ...

  9. 5 Economic Changes That Fatten Your ...
    Active Trading

    5 Economic Changes That Fatten Your ...

  10. Are European ETFs Still A Good Buy?
    Chart Advisor

    Are European ETFs Still A Good Buy?

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Quanto Swap

    A swap with varying combinations of interest rate, currency and equity swap features, where payments are based on the movement of two different countries' interest rates. This is also referred to as a differential or "diff" swap.
  2. Genuine Progress Indicator - GPI

    A metric used to measure the economic growth of a country. It is often considered as a replacement to the more well known gross domestic product (GDP) economic indicator. The GPI indicator takes everything the GDP uses into account, but also adds other figures that represent the cost of the negative effects related to economic activity (such as the cost of crime, cost of ozone depletion and cost of resource depletion, among others).
  3. Accelerated Share Repurchase - ASR

    A specific method by which corporations can repurchase outstanding shares of their stock. The accelerated share repurchase (ASR) is usually accomplished by the corporation purchasing shares of its stock from an investment bank. The investment bank borrows the shares from clients or share lenders and sells them to the company.
  4. Microeconomic Pricing Model

    A model of the way prices are set within a market for a given good. According to this model, prices are set based on the balance of supply and demand in the market. In general, profit incentives are said to resemble an "invisible hand" that guides competing participants to an equilibrium price. The demand curve in this model is determined by consumers attempting to maximize their utility, given their budget.
  5. Centralized Market

    A financial market structure that consists of having all orders routed to one central exchange with no other competing market. The quoted prices of the various securities listed on the exchange represent the only price that is available to investors seeking to buy or sell the specific asset.
  6. Balanced Investment Strategy

    A portfolio allocation and management method aimed at balancing risk and return. Such portfolios are generally divided equally between equities and fixed-income securities.
Trading Center